Tag: OSHA

Construction Company Faces OSHA Safety Violations

A S General Construction Inc has been cited by The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration for exposing workers to potentially fatal fall hazards. The alleged violations took place at a job site in the city of Woburn, Massachusetts.  According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, A S General Construction Inc employees worked from heights of more than 26 feet on an unguarded roof as well as from improperly constructed scaffolding equipment.

The list of hazards at the Woburn job site included lack of head protection and safety glasses, not inspecting erected scaffolding for defects, lack of safe access to the scaffolding and roof, and failure to remove debris from the job site. A S General Construction allegedly failed to provide required fall protection equipment and did not train employees to work on scaffolding equipment in a safe manner. The result was workers were steps away from deadly or disabling falls. The company was cited with two willful violations, as well as seven serious and seven repeat violations of safety in the workplace. The citations carry fines totaling $188,760.

Falls from extended heights are the leading cause of death on construction sites and are preventable with proper training and safety equipment but A S General Construction Inc has been cited repeatedly for failure to provide these things. Previously between 2011 and 2015 the company was cited for similar fall hazards at job sites in Dedham and Windham, New Hampshire.

The latest citations stemming from the Woburn job site have led OSHA to list A S General Construction Inc in its Severe Violators Enforcement Program. This agency program places extra focus on employers who have a history of endangering workers by committing multiple failure-to-abate and willful violations. Under the Severe Violators Enforcement Program, OSHA has the ability to inspect any job sites or facilities operated by A S General Construction Inc if there is reason to believe similar violations are being committed.

The construction company can contest the findings in front of the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission or comply to the requirements and penalties.